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Jordan

2011 July 16 by

Jordan Currency

  • Currency Used: Jordanian Dinar
  • Coins: In denominations of 1, 5, and 10 piastres.
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 dinar.
  • Miscellaneous: Most upper class shops in malls and restaurants will accept US dollars.
  • Visas: Whatever the purpose of their stay, Canadians should be in possession of a visa, which can be obtained on arrival at any border crossing or airport or from any Jordanian diplomatic mission. It is required to register with the police for stays of more than two weeks.

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • Tipping in Jordan is generous but never required.
  • 10% may be added to your bill in hotels and restaurants, but it is custom to leave a small tip for the waiters as well.
  • It is recommended to pay to the nearest round figure when paying for your taxi.
  • 1 or 2 JD or 2 US$ is acceptable for your hotel bellman and porters.

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Ecuador

2011 July 14 by

  • Currency Used: US Dollar
  • Coins: Ecuador has its own coins, which are exactly the same size and weight as US coins up through 50-cent pieces; both Ecuador and US coins are used.
  • ATM: ATMs are widely available in major cities and tourist areas.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Can be exchanged at some, but not all, banks. They are also accepted at some hotels that cater to tourists, although it is difficult to use them elsewhere. There is often a surcharge added to use traveler’s cheques.
  • Credit Cards: Credit and debit cards are accepted at many places that cater to tourists as well as at some upscale shops. However, many places charge a commission for their use as reimbursement for what the banks charge them. You may be asked to show your passport when using a credit or debit card.
  • Visas: Not Required (for stays of less than 90 days).

 

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • Taxis: While the use of meters is obligatory in Quito, drivers consider $1 to be the minimum fare no matter what the meter says. In other places negotiate the fare before getting in. Tipping is not customary, although you may be lead to believe otherwise if you’re an obvious foreigner.
  • Restaurants: Mid-level to upscale restaurants will add a 10% service charge onto your bill (along with a 12% tax). No need to add anything on top, unless the service has been exceptionally stellar – and in that case a dollar or two to indicate your appreciation would be fine.
  • Hotels: Fifty cents per bag is standard.

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Jersey

2011 July 14 by

British Pound Banknotes

  • Currency Used: Jersey Pound
  • Coins: Introduced in denominations of 2 and 1 pounds, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 pence.
  • Banknotes: Introduced in denominations of 50, 20, 10, 5, and 1 pounds.
  • Currency Easily Exchanged: All UK notes and coins are legal tender, and circulate with the Channel Islands issue.
  • Credit Cards: American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa are all widely accepted.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Widely accepted, however expect a service charge/commission.
  • Miscellaneous: Channel Islands notes and coins are not accepted in the UK, although they can be reconverted at parity in UK banks.

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Honduras

2011 July 14 by

Honduras Banknotes

  • Currency Used: Honduras Lempira
  • Coins: 10, 20 and 50 centavos
  • Banknotes: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 lempira
  • Currency Easily Exchanged: The US Dollar acts as a second currency and nearly every business accepts both. The US Dollar is the main currency on the Bay Islands due to the frequency of cruises that come by.
  • ATM: Can be found in most cities. Some ATM’s dispense both U.S. Dollars and Lempiras and nearly all can be used in English. Be sure to bring cash to the Bay Islands because they do not have very many ATMs. ATMs can also often spit out 500 Lempira bills, which can be a hassle to break.
  • Credit Cards: Visa and Mastercard are widely accepted, expect at 6-12% surcharge
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Some banks only cash traveler cheques and foreign cash in the mornings
  • Miscellaneous: The Honduran currency is the lempira, and it is named after an Indian chief that fought to death against the Spanish conquerors. It is assumed that a lempira bill has an image representing the face of the legendary chief Lempira, but instead contains the image of an American Red Indian.
  • Visas: Not required for stays up to 90 days.

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • A tip is sometimes added to your restaurant bill automatically, but this usually only occurs at higher end restaurants.
  • Look for the word ¨servicio ¨ at the bottom of the bill.
  • Many restaurants will put on the check that the servicio is optional, so leaving a tip is up to you.
  • Most waitresses, cooks, and hotel staff make very low wages. Most employees do not earn the minimum wage. A good tip is approximately 10 – 15% of your hotel or restaurant bill.
  • Honduras is one of the poorest countries in Latin America and tipping is one way to spread the wealth a bit more evenly and make your tourist dollars count in a more direct way.

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Guernsey

2011 July 14 by

Petit Bot Bay

  • Currency Used: Guernsey Pound
  • Coins: In denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 pence, and 1 and 2 pounds
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 pounds
  • Credit Cards: Widely accepted. The most common being American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa.
  • Miscellaneous: Since 1921, Guernsey has been in currency union with the United Kingdom and the Guernsey pound is not a separate currency but is a local issue of banknotes and coins denominated in pound sterling. All UK notes and coins are also legal tender, and circulate within the Channel Islands. Some shops will also accept the Euro.
  • Visas: Not required to visit

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Gibraltar

2011 July 14 by

  • Currency Used: Gibraltar Pound
  • Coins: In denominations of £2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 pence.
  • Banknotes: In denominations of £50, 20, 10 and 5.
  • ATM: ATMs are available across Gibraltar.
  • Credit cards: All major cards accepted.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Widely accepted. To avoid additional exchange rate charges, travelers are advised to take traveler’s cheques in Pounds Sterling.
  • Shops: Shops in Gibraltar will usually give you change in UK pounds on request, if they have them. Most shops will accept Euros and US dollars. Keep in mind that shops will generally give you a more expensive rate of exchange than the numerous exchange offices and generally won’t accept small change.
  • Miscellaneous: The UK pound can be used freely in Gibraltar, so there is no need to convert UK pounds to Gibraltar pounds. However, Gibraltarian banknotes are not legal tender in the UK and will not be accepted or exchanged anywhere back in the UK, not even in Exchange offices or banks.
  • Visas: Not required for stays less than 6 months.

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Costa Rica

2011 July 13 by

Costa Rica Banknotes

  • Currency Used: Costa Rican Colon
  • Coins: In denominations of 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 colones.
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 1000, 2000, 5000, and 10,000 colones.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Rarely used. When paying with traveler’s checks, unless for hotel nights, change them first at a bank. Expect long delays with traveler’s checks at the bank, lots of stamping, the higher up the official at the bank the more stamps they have. Only US dollar traveler cheques accepted.
  • Miscellaneous: US dollars are widely accepted – try to bring bills in decent condition.  Money exchange is provided at most banks, however it is recommended to do so at the state banks, especially the Banco Nacional, since they have lower rates.
  • Visas: Canadians arriving in Costa Rica may remain for a period of up to 90 days without a visa. Those wishing to apply for residency status or intending to stay beyond 90 days must apply for their visa from outside the country. Travellers overstaying the 90-day period can expect to pay a fine and risk being deported. Persons deported from Costa Rica will not be allowed to re-enter the country for a 10-year period.

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • Tipping at restaurants, bars and coffee shops is optional.
  • A 10% charge is usually already added to the bill.
  • However, if you feel like service was great, you may leave an extra tip of your choice.
  • If you stay in a hotel and the bellman takes your luggage to your room it is proper to give a tip. Once in the room you may leave a tip to room service personnel and to housekeeping.
  • Also to note, waiters will not bring your bill until you request it. Your plates will be picked up, but they will not hurry you out of the restaurant. You will need to ask for the bill before it will be brought to you.

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Australia

2011 July 13 by

Australian Banknotes

Australian Banknotes

  • Currency Used: Australian Dollar
  • Coins: In denominations of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents, and 1 and 2 dollars
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 dollars
  • ATM: Use may be limited in small towns and outback areas
  • Credit Cards: Major credit cards are accepted however, use may be restricted in small towns and outback areas.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Widely accepted in major currencies at banks or large hotels. However, most banks charge a fee for cashing traveler’s cheques.
  • Miscellaneous: Australian notes are produced in plastic polymer not paper. Also, if the total of a transaction is not a multiple of 5 cents the amount will be rounded to the nearest five cents if you are paying in cash. If you are paying by card the exact amount will be charged.
  • Visas: All visitors apart from citizens of New Zealand require a visa in advance of travel.
  • International Dialing: The international dialing code for Australia is +61.

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • It is not usual to tip for food service, although there are subtle exceptions.
  • Most tips in restaurants are pooled.
  • Some people tip 10% in mid-high priced restaurants when part of a large group. Many Australians do not agree with this practice and it is not required.
  • Tipping in bars and cafes is also not expected, although some people may leave some of their coin change on the bar after picking up their drink, or place coins in a “Tip Jar”.

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United Arab Emirates

2011 June 16 by

UAE Banknote

  • Currency Used: United Arab Emirates Dirham
  • Coins: Introduced in denominations of 25 and 50 fils, and 1 dirham
  • Banknotes: Introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 dirhams
  • ATM: ATMs are numerous and generously distributed. They accept all the major chain cards: Visa, Cirrus, Maestro etc.
  • Credit Cards: Widely accepted.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Cash and travelers’ cheques can be changed at exchanges located at the airports or in all the major shopping malls, but do expect high service charges
  • Visas: A visa is required for tourism and business purposes. Canadians must obtain a visa prior to arrival in the UAE.

 

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • In Dubai, restaurants, hotels and bars apply a service charge. That service charge is said to be pooled amongst the staff and split accordingly.
  • If no service charge is included at a restaurant, add 10%-15% of the total to the bill. If the service or meal was good, you should tip more.
  • You can tip bellboys 5 or 10 Dirhams or so, as you might do so for valet parkers or porters.
  • Taxi drivers don’t expect a tip, but perhaps you should round up to the next 5 Dirhams, especially if you take a short journey in Abu Dhabi.
  • Tipping in bars is not usually expected but can get you speedier service.
  • Places giving personal services such as salons or barbers do not expect a tip.
  • There has been some discussion regarding those who check your oil and fill your gas. It may be that they don’t receive any of the tips that you give and this money goes to the gas station. If you do give anything, 5 Dirhams is acceptable.

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Uruguay

2011 June 16 by

  • Currency Used: Uruguayan Peso
  • Banknotes: Introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 pesos
  • Coins: Introduced in denominations of 50 centavos, 1, 2, 5 and 10 pesos
  • ATM: ATMs are found in most cities and smaller towns.
  • Credit Cards: Most hotels, restaurants and shops accept credit cards.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Can be cashed nationwide at banks and casas de cambio. Commission varies, but usually hovers around the 2-3% mark.
  • Miscellaneous:There are plenty of casas de cambio in Montevideo, Colonia and the Atlantic beach resorts, but banks are the rule in the interior. Casas de cambio offer slightly lower rates and sometimes charge commissions.
  • Visas: A visa is not required. Travelers can normally stay in Uruguay without a tourist or business visa for a period of 90 days.

 

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • Restaurants – Tip a flat 10% of your bill.
  • Baggage Handlers (airport) – If you have the baggage handlers help you with your luggage at the airport, tip U$S 1-2 per bag.
  • Taxi Drivers – Depending upon the distance of your cab ride 5-10 pesos is fine for a cab ride within Montevideo.
  • Street Parking Attendants – You can tip them 5-10 pesos and they’re happy.
  • Porters – A lot of the buildings in Montevideo have porters. It’s common courtesy to tip them monthly. Depending upon the building, 50-100 pesos is acceptable.

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