Continental World Book

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Colorado

2013 March 4 by

Currency Used: US Dollar

Coins

Freq. used 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢

Rarely used 50¢, $1

Banknotes

Freq. used $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100

Rarely used $2, Not Circulated: $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, $100,000

 

 

TIPPING

Restaurants with table service: Tip 15% of the bill, based on the quality of service. If you receive exceptional service, 15-25% is customary.  In major cities of the U.S. however, 20% is considered to be a “good tip”. If you’re with a large party, be sure to check your bill just in case. 15% – 20% is often automatically charged for a large party (six or more).

Bartenders:$1 – $2 per drink, or 15-20% of the total bill.

Hotel housekeeping/maid service: $2-3 per night up to $5, more in high-end hotels.

Concierge: Tipping is never expected, but always appreciated.

In-suite dining waiter:  Always read the bill, if there is a tip included, it will be on the bill breakdown.  Ask the server.  The policy of having the gratuity included in the bill is not the norm anymore.  A service charge or convenience fee goes to the hotel, not the server.  If there is no gratuity added, tip the server 15% – 20%.

Bellman/Porter: $1-2 per bag. More if the bags are very heavy.

Taxi Driver: 10-15% of fare, based on service.

Hotel limo driver: For a free ride from the airport, $10 – $20

Drink Server in a casino or bar: $1-$2 per drink.

Valet Parking Attendants: $2 – $5 (when picking up car).

Dealers at Table Games in the Casinos:   5% of bet amount at end of session, or occasional bet for dealer in amount of your normal wager-dealer can show you where to place bet.

Spa: For a massage or other treatment, 10% – 20%.  Ask if the tip has been included, some spas will include a gratuity on your final bill.  Most spas will provide you with an envelope to leave at the reception desk for the person who gave you your treatment.

Hairdresser/manicurist: 10% – 20%.

Showroom captains: $1-2 for the person who seats you, more if you asked for “special” seating – $20 for a requested booth or table, more for one up front.

Tour Guides: 15% – 20% + depending on quality (knowledge, friendliness, etc).

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Puerto Rico

2013 March 4 by

Currency Used: US Dollars

Coins

Freq. used 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢

Rarely used 50¢, $1

Banknotes

Freq. used $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100

Rarely used $2, Not Circulated: $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, $100,000

 

ATM:  There are plenty of ATMs around the commonwealth. Most are linked to the Cirrus, Plus, American Express and Discover networks. Even many small-town banks in the middle of nowhere have ATMs. They are common in most shopping areas and are often available 24 hours a day. Remember that ATMs in remote locations and on Vieques and Culebra run out of money sometimes on weekends. Some American banks take advantage of Puerto Rico’s commonwealth status to charge a hefty $7 dollar fee on each ‘international’ withdrawal you make.

Credit Cards:  Major credit cards are accepted at hotels, restaurants, gas stations, shops and car rental agencies throughout Puerto Rico. In fact, you’ll find it hard to perform certain transactions, such as renting a car or purchasing tickets to performances, without one.

Traveler’s Cheques:  Traveler’s Cheques are not commonly used.

 

 

TIPPING

  • In restaurants and better hotels tip 15% unless the service is terrible, or about 20% if the service is great.
  • Taxi drivers, hairdressers and baggage carriers expect tips, and waiters and bartenders rely on tips.
  • Never tip in fast-food, take-out or buffet-style restaurants where you serve yourself.
  • Baggage carriers in airports and hotels get $2 for the first bag and $1 for each additional bag.
  • In hotels with daily housekeeping staff, leave a few dollars in the room when you check out.

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US – Nevada

2013 March 4 by

The United States dollar, also referred to as the U.S. dollar or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States of America and its overseas territories. It is divided into 100 smaller units called cents.

The U.S. dollar is the currency most used in international transactions and is one of the world’s dominant reserve currencies. Several countries use it as their official currency,

Coins

Freq. used 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢

Rarely used 50¢, $1

Banknotes

Freq. used $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100

Rarely used $2, Not Circulated: $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, $100,000

 

 

TIPPING

Restaurants with table service: Tip 15% of the bill, based on the quality of service. If you receive exceptional service, 15-25% is customary.  In major cities of the U.S. however, 20% is considered to be a “good tip”. If you’re with a large party, be sure to check your bill just in case. 15% – 20% is often automatically charged for a large party (six or more).

Bartenders:$1 – $2 per drink, or 15-20% of the total bill.

Hotel housekeeping/maid service: $2-3 per night up to $5, more in high-end hotels.

Concierge: Tipping is never expected, but always appreciated.

In-suite dining waiter:  Always read the bill, if there is a tip included, it will be on the bill breakdown.  Ask the server.  The policy of having the gratuity included in the bill is not the norm anymore.  A service charge or convenience fee goes to the hotel, not the server.  If there is no gratuity added, tip the server 15% – 20%.

Bellman/Porter: $1-2 per bag. More if the bags are very heavy.

Taxi Driver: 10-15% of fare, based on service.

Hotel limo driver: For a free ride from the airport, $10 – $20

Drink Server in a casino or bar: $1-$2 per drink.

Valet Parking Attendants: $2 – $5 (when picking up car).

Dealers at Table Games in the Casinos:   5% of bet amount at end of session, or occasional bet for dealer in amount of your normal wager-dealer can show you where to place bet.

Spa: For a massage or other treatment, 10% – 20%.  Ask if the tip has been included, some spas will include a gratuity on your final bill.  Most spas will provide you with an envelope to leave at the reception desk for the person who gave you your treatment.

Hairdresser/manicurist: 10% – 20%.

Showroom captains: $1-2 for the person who seats you, more if you asked for “special” seating – $20 for a requested booth or table, more for one up front.

Tour Guides: 15% – 20% + depending on quality (knowledge, friendliness, etc).

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The Netherlands

2013 March 4 by

  • Currency Used: Euro
  • Coins: In denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents, and 1 and 2 euros
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 euros
  • ATMs:  ATM’s are readily available, mostly near shopping and nightlife areas. The very smallest ones excluded, even villages usually have an ATM.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Travelers cheques (including eurocheques) are on the way out in the Netherlands – you’ll be very hard pressed to find a bank who will change them for you.
  • Credit Cards: Credit cards such as Visa and MasterCard/Eurocard are widely accepted, as well as cash cards that access the Cirrus network. Be aware that, if you’re limited to a maximum withdrawal per day, the ‘day’ will coincide with that in your home country. Shops often levy a 5% surcharge (or more) on credit cards to offset the commissions charged by card providers.
  • Miscellaneous: A lot of shops do not accept banknotes of €100, €200 and €500, due to concerns about counterfeiting and burglary.

 

TIPPING

Tipping is not essential as restaurants, hotels, bars etc include a service charge on their bills. A little extra is always welcomed though, and it’s an excellent way to compliment the service (if you feel it needs complimenting). The tip can be anything from rounding up to the nearest euro, to 10% of the bill.

VISAS

If you have a Canadian passport, then you don’t need a visa to enter the Netherlands.

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US – Hawaii

2013 March 4 by

Currency: US Dollar

Banknotes: In denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 dollars

Coins: 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents, and 1 dollar

ATMs: ATM machines are plentiful.

Traveler’s Cheques: Traveler’s cheques are widely accepted.

Credit Cards: Credit cards are widely accepted.

 

TIPPING

US standards on tipping apply:
Restaurants: 15-20%. Check to see if “gratuity” is included for large parties.
Bar: $0.50-$1 US per drink
Housekeeping: $1 US per bed, per night
Luggage porters: $1 US per bag
Doorman: $1 US for calling a taxi
Room Service: 10-15% of the total bill
Taxi: 15% of fare

 

VISAS

Visitors from the United States and Canada do not require a Visa to enter Hawaii. However, for visitors from the rest of the world, a Hawaii Visa is a must, unless you are eligible for the Visa Waiver Programme (VWP). All visitors must ensure that the passports they carry are valid for six months beyond the period for which they plan to stay.

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Lebanon

2012 May 24 by

Currency: Lebanese Lira (Known locally as the Lebanese Pound)

Banknotes: In denominations of 1000, 5000, 10,000, 20,000, 50,000, and 100,000 pounds
Coins: In denominations of 25, 50, and 100 piastres, 250, and 500 pounds
Currency Easily Exchanged: US dollars are accepted almost everywhere; It is common to pay in US dollars but receive change in pounds.
ATMs: The best way to access cash is through the ATMs found in all larger towns. ATMs accept credit cards or co-branded home banking cards for Cirrus, Diners Club, Maestro, MasterCard, Visa and Visa-Electron and dispense cash in both Lebanese lira and US dollars.
Traveler’s Cheques: Not accepted almost everywhere
Credit Cards: Budget hotels and restaurants do not accept credit cards.

 

TIPPING

• At Restaurants: Tip 10 percent of the bill
• At Hotels: Tips are included if on group tours; otherwise, it is wise to tip $2 US a bag for porters, $2 US for doormen who hail a cab or give directions, a few bucks a day for maids. Giving $20 US to $25 US to the concierge up front will secure you good service throughout your stay.
• Guides and Drivers: If you’re not in a prepaid group, tip guides about $10 US per person per day, drivers $5 US per person per day.
• If you visit churches in Lebanon, leave something in the offering box at the entrance. It’s appropriate for the guest to bring a small gift to a Lebanese home, especially on first visits. This gift could be flowers or sweets.

 

VISAS
• Visas for Lebanon are required for Canadian citizens.
• You can obtain a one month visa on arrival at Beirut International Airport or any other port of entry at the Lebanese border, providing passport holders do not possess an Israeli stamp, and they hold return or onward tickets. It is renewable for three months.
• All visitors requiring a visa for Lebanon should contact the consulate (or consular section at embassy) before leaving.
• It is likely you will be refused entry if you have an Israeli visa or stamp in your passport.

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Tanzania

2012 April 11 by

Currency Used: Tanzanian Shilling

Coins: In denominations of 50, 100 and 200, 100 shillings

Banknotes: In denominations of 500, 1000, 2000, 5000 and 10,000 shillings

Currency Easily Exchanged: US Dollars

ATM: ATMs are mostly located in the city center and on the Msasani Peninsula. For those wishing to withdraw money from bank accounts back home, ATMs work with PLUS and Cirrus compatible cards.

Credit Cards: Credit Cards can only be used in large hotels, resorts, and with certain travel agents. Do expect a high exchange rate and additional service fees when using any debit or credit card. In short, Tanzania is still a cash society.
Traveler’s Cheques: Traveler’s Checks have become virtually impossible to cash in almost all banks in Tanzania.

Miscellaneous: Older US $100 notes are no longer accepted in Tanzania, and any note older than 2003 will most likely be refused everywhere. In general, stores, restaurants, and hotels in Tanzania expect payment in shillings. Exceptions include payment for travel visas, entry fees to national parks (which must be paid in US dollars by non-residents), and payments for safaris and Kilimanjaro treks, which are generally priced in US dollars (though payment will be also accepted in other currencies).

Visas: A visa is required to enter Tanzania. Although visas are available upon arrival, it is recommended that Canadians obtain visas prior to arrival in Tanzania.

 

TIPPING

  • Tipping in Tanzania is not expected, but certainly appreciated.  If you feel that the quality of service you have received is good, you may leave a tip to show your appreciation to those who have served or guided you.
  • For guides, a guideline of US$10 per person per day is reasonable.
  • For servers, a guideline of US$5-$10 per day is reasonable, depending on the establishment and the service.
  • Since food is often included in the price of the lodges, it may be difficult to calculate a 10-15% tip on the bill.
  • For porters, US$1-2 per bag is reasonable.
  • Outside of tours, tipping is not generally required for other services such as taxis, barbers and restaurants. If service is very good at a restaurant, you may consider rounding the bill to a convenient amount. The locals will not tip in restaurants.

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Canada

2012 February 7 by

  • Currency Used: Canadian dollar
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dollars
  • Coins: In denominations of 1, 5, 10, and 25 cents, 1 and 2 dollars
  • ATM: ATM’s are widely available throughout Canada. Even in small towns, it is very unlikely that you would not find an ATM.
  • Credit Cards: Credit cards are widely accepted across Canada. Most ATM’s allow cash withdrawals on major credit cards and international debit cards.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Traveler’s cheques are not as common.

 

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

  • Gratuities are rarely included in Canadian restaurants.
  • It is customary to tip approximately 15% on the total bill before tax, 20% for exceptional service.
  • Tipping is also customary for other service providers such as hotels, hairdressers, manicurists, aestheticians and taxi drivers.

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Ireland (Southern)

2011 December 17 by

Euro Banknotes

  • Currency Used: Euro
  • Coins: In denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents, and 1 and 2 euros
  • Banknotes: In denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 euros
  • Currency Easily Exchanged: Note that Northern Ireland uses the Northern Irish Pound, and Great British Pound – there may be some places in Southern Ireland that accept these currencies.
  • ATM: ATMs are widely available throughout Ireland. Even in small towns it is unlikely that you will be unable to find an ATM.
  • Credit Cards: Mastercard, Maestro and Visa are accepted virtually everywhere. American Express and Diners Club are now also fairly widely accepted. Most ATM’s allow cash withdrawals on major credit cards and international debit cards.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Traveler’s Cheques are not as common, however US traveler’s cheques are preferred.
  • Visas: A visa is not required for stays up to 90 days.

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

There is not a strong tipping culture in Ireland, however tipping from visitors has recently become more common.  It is common to tip up to 10% of the bill total.

Restaurant: Some establishments will add a 10-15% service charge on top of the obligatory 13.5% Government VAT charge, especially for larger groups. If a service charge is levied, a tip would not normally be left, unless to reward exceptional service. If you were unhappy with the service, then you would normally leave no tip.

Bartenders: No tip expected.  (If you are part of a large group who have had a number of drinks and exceptional service from the staff you might consider a tip of €1 to €2).

Hotel housekeeping/maid service:  Tip at your discretion- €1 – €2 per night.

Concierge: No tip expected unless they provide exceptional service and you feel they deserve one.

Hotel porter: €1 – €2 per bag if it is brought to your room in a friendly and courteous manner, generally not over €5.   Most hotels do not provide this service anyway unless you ask and many hotels may not even provide this service.

Bed and breakfast proprietors/staff: The majority of bed and breakfasts in Ireland are small family undertakings and it is not expected that guests tip for either food service or housekeeping.  In larger bed and breakfasts and guest houses where staff are employed,  it is acceptable to tip staff but it is certainly not expected nor required.

Taxi Driver: No tip  expected nowdays round up to the nearest Euro. Tip 5% to10% of the fare if the driver has been particularly helpful informative and courteous. Ranges are usually €1 to €10 Euros ( €10 would be considered a very large tip)

Spa: No tip expected

Hairdresser/manicurist: 10% of the bill

Tour Guides: If a group have enjoyed their tour and there was exceptional service from the tour guide, it might be a good idea to  contribute a small amount each to the tip. Tour drivers are usually included in this.

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Libya

2011 July 16 by

  • Currency Used: Libyan Dinar
  • Coins: In denominations of ¼ dinar, ½ dinar and, 50 and 100 dirhams.
  • Banknotes: In denominations of ¼, ½, 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 dinars
  • Credit Cards: Major credit cards are accepted at some major hotels and banks in Tripoli (the capital of Libya), but are not widely used.
  • ATM: There are not many reliable ATMs.
  • Traveler’s Cheques: Not typically accepted.
  • Miscellaneous: Libya uses cash predominantly.
  • Visas: A visa is required to enter Libya. Note that Canadians have had difficulties obtaining a visa without a six-month validity period remaining in their passports.

 

TIPPING GUIDELINES

Coming Soon.

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